“The real problem with Moneyball, however, is not Lewis’s failure to understand baseball history. It’s his failure to see what was going on right in front of his and Beane’s eyes in 2002. In their book, The Beauty of Short Hops: How Chance and Circumstance Confound the Moneyball Approach to Baseball, Sheldon Hirsch and Alan Hirsch point out perhaps the biggest hole in Lewis’s analysis.”

Source: http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2011/09/the-many-problems-with-moneyball/245769/2/

“For those of us who have long questioned the focus on statistics in baseball, this is a welcome book. With careful and detailed research, the Messrs Hirsch take apart the Bill James-Moneyball myths and provide sensible and balanced bases for analyzing our great Game.”

By Murray Chass (former award-winning New York Times columnist)

“The book slices and dices the thinking behind Moneyball. . . . A terrific book.”

Moneyball is a fraud, and a new book, The Beauty of Short Hops: How Chance and Circumstance Confound the Moneyball Approach to Baseball, does a good job exposing the emperor’s fanny. . . . Alan and Sheldon Hirsch do a fine job exposing sabermetrics as a cult posing as a science, while still giving credit to some of the positive things sabermetrics has brought to the table.”

George Hunter, Detroit News

“The mammoth best seller Moneyball revolutionized baseball, a sport already obsessed with statistics. Until the recently published, The Beauty of Short Hops: How Chance and Circumstance Confound the Moneyball Approach to Baseball, by Sheldon and Alan Hirsch, no writer had taken on Michael Lewis and Bill James. Thankfully, the Hirsch brothers provided the first sensible rebuttal to the Moneyball approach. . . . The authors . . . pick apart Michael Lewis’s arguments with relish.”

Nat Frum, FrumForum

“The authors kept me reading, and thinking, even when I disagreed. . . . . The latter stages of the book consisted of the Hirsches taking note of dozens of memorable/quirky occurrences from the 2009 MLB season. It’s a ton of fun to read about them all. . . . “This book comes primarily from a place of pure love for the game. . . . This is a book worth reading . . . . It’s level-headed and a breezy read.”

Glenn Davis, SportsGrid

“Good, fun stuff…. The descriptions of bizarre incidents and freak plays make for a good read and is done in a similar vein as some of Rob Neyer’s work on the game’s historical oddities.”

Joe Tarring, fullcountpitch.com

“Engagingly written . . . Highly recommended.”

“Very compelling book.”

Kevin Greenstein, Inside Hockey